NSF International Applied Research Center to analyze biomarkers of chemical exposures such as pesticides as part of a $9.5M U-M study of environmental impacts on children’s health

Ann Arbor, Mich. – NSF International’s Applied Research Center, which provides custom research and testing services, will partner with the University of Michigan to study the impact of the environment on children’s health as part of the Michigan hub of the Children’s Health Exposure Analysis Resource (M-CHEAR) Program.

The NSF Applied Research Center provides research and development services for all major industries including contract method development; testing and consulting services in chemistry, microbiology, genomics and toxicology; product claim verification; lab quality/management; methods training; and human health risk assessment.

U-M was chosen as one of six national research hubs of the new CHEAR Program by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health. ARC will provide sensitive analysis of biomarkers of exposure to a broad range of chemicals, such as pesticides, in ongoing studies of children’s health being carried out across the country.

M-CHEAR will support scientists across the country whose research focuses on the causes of adverse child health such as preterm birth, reproductive tract anomalies, obesity, asthma and allergies, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism and early onset puberty.

NSF’s Applied Research Center was selected as a partner with U-M on this project because of a strong history of successful collaborations between NSF International’s and the U-M School of Public Health. NSF International ARC was a natural fit as a collaborator for the project given its analytical expertise, exceptional quality, testing capacity, quick result turnaround time and commitment to protecting public health.

“Providing support to the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health allows NSF International to engage in a broader range of research and analysis while supporting our overall mission of furthering public health initiatives,” said Dr. Robert Donofrio, Director of the Applied Research Center at NSF International.

“The primary objective of M-CHEAR is to contribute to large-scale national efforts to advance knowledge of the impact of the environment on child health by offering high-quality, state of the art laboratory support for researchers conducting epidemiology and clinical studies of child health,” said M-CHEAR Director John Meeker, Professor of Environmental Health Sciences and Associate Dean for Research at the U-M School of Public Health. “In the past, NSF International has provided state-of-the-art laboratory services in my research studying the health impacts of exposure to chemicals commonly encountered in the environment. This project was a natural extension of our previous successful collaboration.”

Other CHEAR hubs are located at Emory University, the University of Minnesota, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, RTI International and the Wadsworth Center of the New York State Department of Health.

Editor’s Note: To schedule an interview with Rob Donofrio, Ph.D., Director of the NSF International Applied Research Center, please contact Liz Nowland-Margolis at media@nsf.org or 734-418-6624.

About NSF International: NSF International is a global independent organization that writes standards, and tests and certifies products for the water, food, health sciences and consumer goods industries to minimize adverse health effects and protect the environment (nsf.org).

NSF International’s Applied Research Center provides custom research and development services for all major industries including contract method development; testing and consulting services in chemistry, microbiology, genomics and toxicology; product claim verification; lab quality/management; methods training; and human health risk assessment.

About the University of Michigan School of Public Health: The University of Michigan School of Public Health has been working to promote health and prevent disease since 1941, and is consistently ranked among the top schools in the country. Faculty and students in the school's six academic departments and dozens of collaborative centers and institutes are forging new solutions to complex health challenges, including chronic disease, health care quality and finance, emerging genetic technologies, climate change, socioeconomic inequalities and their impact on health, infectious disease, and the globalization of health. Whether making new discoveries in the lab or researching and educating in the field, our faculty, students, and alumni are deployed around the globe to promote and protect our health